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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1994 Feb;93(2):484-93.

The effect of immunotherapy on the cutaneous late phase response to antigen.

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1
Allergy-Immunology Department, Wilford Hall United States Air Force Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study used the skin chamber model to evaluate prospectively the effect of immunotherapy (IT) on the cutaneous early and late phase response (LPR) to epicutaneous antigen challenge.

METHODS:

Nine subjects with allergic rhinitis were studied at three time points: before starting IT, after 3 months of IT, and after 6 months of IT. Skin chamber histamine content was measured hourly for 12 hours, and cell counts performed hourly during hours 6 to 12. An intradermal skin test was placed, and the reaction was measured hourly for 12 hours. Skin biopsy specimens were obtained 8 hours after intradermal placement and evaluated for cellular infiltrate and major basic protein deposition. Serum antigen-specific IgG and IgE levels were measured at each time point to confirm physiologic effect of IT.

RESULTS:

Six months of IT significantly (p < 0.05) decreased both early and LPR skin test reactivity and skin chamber histamine for hours 1 to 3, 4 to 6, and 9 to 12. Skin chamber LPR cellular influx decreased significantly (p < 0.05) for neutrophils only. Decrease in LPR histamine after 6 months of IT was significantly correlated with both decrease in mononuclear cells (R2 = 0.817, p = 0.002) and decrease in neutrophils (R2 = 0.813, p = 0.009). Also significantly correlated were decrease in LPR skin test reactivity, with percent change in skin chamber mononuclear cells (R2 = 0.800, p = 0.009) and decrease in early skin test reactivity (R2 = 0.675, p = 0.01). Biopsy specimens showed no consistent change in either dermal cellular infiltrate or deposition of major basic protein.

CONCLUSION:

IT significantly attenuates cutaneous histamine release and skin test reactivity and is accompanied by a decrease in skin chamber LPR neutrophil influx without significantly altering the dermal infiltrate at 8 hours.

PMID:
8120276
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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