Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pancreas. 1994 Jan;9(1):42-6.

Effect of alcohol and smoking on pancreatic lithogenesis in the course of chronic pancreatitis.

Author information

1
Istituto di Clinica Medica, Cattedra di Gastroenterologia, University of Verona, Italy.

Abstract

The aim of the study was to establish whether correlations were discernible between calcification, smoking, and other variables--including alcohol intake--in chronic pancreatitis. A total of 637 patients with chronic pancreatitis diagnosed over the period of 1973-1989 were reviewed. Only patients who had had one or more instrumental tests (ultrasonography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, plain film of the abdomen) every 3 years were included in the study. Onset of calcification was taken as the end point of the follow-up. No statistically significant correlation was found between alcohol intake and calcification. As regards smoking habits, patients were divided into two groups: nonsmokers and medium-to-heavy smokers (> or = 10 cigarettes/day). Of 637 patients, only 570 fulfilled our criteria. Three hundred seventy-six patients (66%) developed calcifications, whereas 64 (10%) already presented calcifications at the time of diagnosis. Smoking correlated with formation of calcifications (p < 0.004). The mean time to onset of calcification in smokers was 8 years as against 12 years in nonsmokers. The relative risk of calcification in smokers versus nonsmokers was 1.21 (95% confidence limits: 1.10-1.32). By the end of follow-up (17 years), 277 smokers (69%) with chronic pancreatitis had developed calcifications compared with only 93 nonsmokers (55%). The results show that, in this sample of chronic pancreatitis sufferers, smokers present a significantly increased risk of developing calcifications.

PMID:
8108370
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wolters Kluwer
    Loading ...
    Support Center