Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Appl Microbiol. 1975 Sep;30(3):381-5.

Distribution and persistence of Staphylococcus and Micrococcus species and other aerobic bacteria on human skin.

Abstract

The districution of Staphylococcus and Micrococcus species and associated coryneform bacteria, Acinetobacter, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Bacillus, and Streptomyces on skin was determined during October 1971 from samples collected on persons living in North Carolina and New Jersey. Persistence of these organisms on skin was estimated in temporal studies conducted during the period from June 1971 to June 1972 on persons living in North Carolina. Staphylococci and coryneforms were the most predominant and persistent bacteria isolated from the nares and axillae. Staphylococci, coryneforms, micrococci, and Bacillus were the most predominant and persistent bacteria isolated from the head, legs, and arms. Acinetobacters were most frequently isolated during the warmer months of the years. Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis were the most predominant and persistent staphylococci isolated from the nares, whereas S. epidermidis and S. hominis were the most predominant and persistent staphylocicci isolated from the axillae, head, legs, and arms. S. capitis was often isolated from the head and arms and S. haemolyticus was often isolated from the head, legs, and arms. S. simulans, S. xylosus, S. cohnii, S. saprophyticus, S. warneri, and an unclassified coagulase-positive species were only occasionally isolated from skin. Micrococcus luteus was the most predominant and persistent Micrococcus isolated from skin and preferred regions of the head, legs, and arms. M. varians was the second most frequent Micrococcus isolated. M. lylae, M. sedentarius, M. roseus, M. kristinae, and M. nishinomiyaensis were only occasionally isolated from skin. M. lylae was most frequently isolated during the colder months of the years.

PMID:
810086
PMCID:
PMC187193
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center