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Immunology. 1993 May;79(1):1-9.

Primary human T-cell responses to the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis.

Author information

1
Antigen Presentation Research Group, Clinical Research Centre, Harrow, Middlesex, U.K.

Abstract

The major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydia trachomatis is the main candidate antigen for a synthetic vaccine against chlamydial infection. Antibodies to surface-exposed epitopes on MOMP neutralize chlamydial infectivity but little is known about T-cell recognition of the molecule. We have measured primary human T-cell responses to recombinant fragments of MOMP as well as to the whole organism and synthetic MOMP peptides. Using antigen-pulsed low density cells (LDC) we were able to stimulate proliferative responses with T cells from most naive individuals. This response was antigen dose dependent and displayed an absolute requirement for dendritic cells in the antigen-presenting cell (APC) population. Several T-cell epitopes were identified in MOMP and one which stimulated T cells from 80% of donors was resolved as a 12 amino acid synthetic peptide. Dual cell surface labelling and cell cycle analysis by FACS revealed that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were stimulated in these cultures. The fact that we were able to obtain proliferative responses and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production to MOMP using cells from cord bloods confirmed that these are genuine primary responses. These experiments have identified a region on MOMP, to which T cells from most humans make a primary response, which may be useful in a chlamydial vaccine. The approach is useful for vaccine development in general.

PMID:
8099564
PMCID:
PMC1422044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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