Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Intern Med. 1993 Mar 1;118(5):350-5.

Effects of HIV infection on the serologic manifestations and response to treatment of syphilis in intravenous drug users.

Author information

1
Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the effects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on the serologic manifestations and response to treatment of syphilis in intravenous drug users.

DESIGN:

Cohort study of intravenous drug users.

SETTING:

Medical clinic in a hospital-based methadone maintenance treatment program in New York City.

PATIENTS:

Fifty patients with syphilis, of whom 31 were HIV seropositive and 19 HIV seronegative.

MEASUREMENTS:

Serologic tests for syphilis and clinical manifestations.

RESULTS:

Stage of syphilis at presentation was not associated with HIV serologic status. No unusual or fulminant manifestations of early syphilis or neurosyphilis were noted among HIV-seropositive cases. Maximum nontreponemal titers were higher among HIV-seropositive (median, 1:128) than among HIV-seronegative (median, 1:32) patients with syphilis (P = 0.05); this difference was present only among patients with first-episode syphilis. All 26 evaluable, HIV-seropositive patients treated for syphilis responded appropriately, including 13 patients given standard or less-than-standard doses of penicillin. Seven of 43 patients (16%) showed reversion to negative treponemal antibody assay results after treatment for syphilis; this finding was not associated with HIV infection, CD4 count, or stage of syphilis. Low nontreponemal titer was weakly associated with treponemal test reversion.

CONCLUSIONS:

Infection with HIV did not alter the stage at presentation, clinical course, serologic manifestations, or response to treatment of syphilis in this cohort of intravenous drug users.

Comment in

PMID:
8094280
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center