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Diabet Med. 1994 Jun;11(5):432-6.

Loss of the first phase insulin response to intravenous glucose in subjects with persistent impaired glucose tolerance.

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1
Ipswich Diabetes Centre, Ipswich Hospital, UK.

Abstract

Loss of the first phase insulin response to intravenous glucose is one of the earliest detectable defects of beta cell dysfunction in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is considered a prediabetic condition, therefore loss of first phase insulin secretion in subjects with IGT would suggest beta cell dysfunction as an early lesion in the development of Type 2 diabetes. Three groups of subjects were studied, 7 subjects with persistent IGT (classified as having IGT at two 75 g oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) done 6 months apart), 6 subjects with transient IGT (IGT at the first OGTT, but normal glucose tolerance at a repeat OGTT 6 months later), and 7 normal controls. First phase insulin secretion was studied using an intravenous glucose tolerance test with arterialized blood sampling. Fasting, 3, 4 and 5 min samples were assayed for glucose and insulin (specific two-site immunoradiometric assay). The fasting insulin was similar in all three groups, however the 3 min insulin response was significantly lower in those with persistent impaired glucose tolerance (p < 0.02). Thus subjects with persistent impaired glucose tolerance demonstrated loss of the first phase insulin response as an early indicator of beta cell dysfunction while subjects with transient IGT had a normal insulin response to intravenous glucose. During the OGTT, the 30 min glucose was not significantly different (p = 0.1) but the 30 min insulin to glucose ratio was significantly lower in subjects with persistent IGT (p < 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

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