Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Bull World Health Organ. 1994;72(3):409-22.

Improving vaccination coverage in urban areas through a health communication campaign: the 1990 Philippine experience.

Author information

1
Center for International, Health, and Development Communication, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104-6220.

Abstract

From March to September 1990 the Philippine Department of Health, with the assistance of the HEALTHCOM Project, carried out a national mass-media communication campaign to support routine vaccination services. The essential elements of the campaign strategy were as follows: focusing on measles as a way to get mothers to bring their children to the health centre; emphasizing logistic knowledge in the mass-media messages, in particular popularizing a single day of the week as "vaccination day" and giving clear information about the age for measles vaccination; and focusing on urban areas, which had lower vaccination rates than rural areas. Evaluation of the effects of the campaign indicates an increase in vaccination coverage and a substantial increase in the timeliness of vaccination that can be attributed to improvement in carers' knowledge about vaccination. Furthermore, most of the observed increase in knowledge was related to exposure to the mass-media campaign. There was no evidence of any programmatic change that could account for the increase in vaccination or evidence that increased health education efforts at health centres could account for the change in knowledge. These results indicate that when countries meet certain conditions--a high level of access to the media, sufficient expertise and funds available to develop and produce high-quality radio and television advertisements, and a routine system that is able to serve the increased demand--a mass communication campaign can significantly improve vaccination coverage.

PIP:

The Philippine Department of Health conducted a national mass media communication campaign during the period March-September 1990 to support routine vaccination services. The campaign focused upon measles as a way to get mothers to bring their children to the health center, emphasized logistic knowledge in the mass-media messages, and focused upon urban areas with lower vaccination rates than rural areas. Examples of logistic emphasis include designating one day per week as vaccination day and giving clear information about the age for measles vaccination. An increase in vaccination coverage and a substantial increase in the timeliness of vaccination were observed which may be attributed to the improvement in carers' knowledge about vaccination. Most observed increase in knowledge was related to campaign exposure. There was no evidence of any programmatic change which could account for the increase in vaccination or evidence that increased health education efforts at health centers could account for the change in knowledge. These results indicate that when countries meet certain conditions, a mass communication campaign can significantly improve vaccination coverage. Conditions include access to media, expertise, and funds to produce and air high quality television and radio spots, and a routine system capable of handling the increased demand.

PMID:
8062399
PMCID:
PMC2486710
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center