Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1994 May 15;19(10):1117-23; discussion 1123-4.

Increasing rates of cervical and lumbar spine surgery in the United States, 1979-1990.

Author information

1
Division of Health Examination Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Maryland.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Data from annual national surveys of hospitalizations were used to review trends.

OBJECTIVES:

The trends in rates of hospitalizations with cervical and lumbar spine surgery were examined among persons > or = 25 years old.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

Preliminary analysis of national survey data indicated that during 1979 to 1990 the number of spine operations increased markedly.

METHODS:

Data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey were used to calculate age-adjusted rates of hospitalizations.

RESULTS:

From 1979-81 to 1988-90, in each sex, the rate of hospitalizations with cervical spine surgery increased > 45%, with the rates for cervical fusion surgery increasing > 70%. The rate of hospitalizations with lumbar spine surgery increased > 33% in each sex, with the rate for lumbar fusion surgery increasing > 60% in each sex, the rate for lumbar disc surgery increasing 40% among males and 21% among females, and the rate for lumbar exploration/decompression surgery increasing > 65% in each sex.

CONCLUSIONS:

Between 1979 and 1990, rates of hospitalizations with cervical and lumbar spine surgery increased markedly among both sexes and for different categories of spine surgery.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center