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Midwifery. 1994 Jun;10(2):87-103.

The impact of obstetric procedures and analgesia/anaesthesia during labour and delivery on breast feeding.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

to assess the impact of obstetric procedures and analgesia/anaesthesia during delivery on breast feeding at six weeks post-delivery.

METHOD:

secondary analysis of data from a UK study of pain relief in labour using a postal questionnaire sent to a subset of respondents at six weeks post-delivery.

PARTICIPANTS:

10% (1149) of the sample from the original study.

FINDINGS:

method of delivery, method of induction of labour, length of the second stage of labour, use of pethidine and lignocaine, relaxation/breathing techniques, the use of TENS, gestation at delivery, baby birth weight, and the mother's own physical health were associated with baby feeding practice at six weeks post-delivery.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

improved perineal suturing expertise, less delay before suturing, more effective pain relief for perineal discomfort, efforts to reduce the incidence of urinary frequency will result in improved breast feeding rates. Where a woman has had pethidine late in the first stage of labour she should be given extra help with breast feeding. Extra help should also be given to a woman separated from her baby, due to admission to the neonatal unit.

PMID:
8057961
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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