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J Invest Dermatol. 1994 Jul;103(1):19-22.

Molecular subtyping of Borrelia burgdorferi in erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans.

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1
Department of Dermatology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Germany.

Abstract

Recently, three subtypes of Borrelia burgdorferi have been identified: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii, and the VS 461 group of Borrelia burgdorferi. These subtypes differ by nucleotide sequence variations within several Borrelia burgdorferi specific genes and most likely by their pathogenetic potential. To assess whether different subtypes of Borrelia burgdorferi might be associated with different cutaneous manifestations and clinical courses of Lyme disease, lesional skin biopsies from 35 patients with erythema migrans and 18 patients with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans were analyzed. A Borrelia burgdorferi specific gene segment encoding a 26-kD protein with subtype specific nucleotide sequence variations was amplified by a nested polymerase chain reaction technique. For molecular subtyping, the products were transcribed into complementary RNA. Upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, complementary RNA molecules separate into several metastable conformational forms resulting in patterns of bands highly specific for the nucleotide sequence of the transcribed molecules. In biopsy specimens of erythema migrans, the VS 461 subtype was detected in 28 of 35 and the Borrelia garinii subtype in six of 35 cases. In one of 35 cases of erythema migrans Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto as well as Borrelia garinii was detected. In contrast, in all 18 biopsies of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, only the VS 461 subtype was identified. This subtype is rarely found in the USA, where acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is almost unknown. These data indicate that acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans might be closely associated with the VS 461 group of Borrelia burgdorferi.

PMID:
8027576
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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