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Epilepsia. 1994 May-Jun;35(3):675-84.

Epilepsy and driving: an international perspective. Joint Commission on Drivers' Licensing of the International Bureau for Epilepsy and the International League Against Epilepsy.

Author information

1
Barrow Neurologic Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona 85013-4496.

Abstract

Individuals with a history of seizures may be granted driving privileges if the risks of future seizure while driving are relatively low. Different nations have defined these risks in a wide variety of ways. Some countries, e.g., Japan, Greece, Brazil, India, and Russia, preclude driving after a single seizure. Other countries, such as Canada and the United States, allow driving < or = 3 months after certain types of seizures. A Joint Commission of the International Bureau for Epilepsy/International League Against Epilepsy has summarized regulations in several countries. From a consideration of medical literature and existing practices, a series of proposed guidelines for driving and epilepsy is recommended. In general, these guidelines suggest use of a seizure-free interval, generally 1-2 years but less in particular instances, to determine fitness to drive. Required physician reporting is discouraged, but physicians should report patients whom they believe pose a danger to themselves and to public safety. Individualized consideration should be given to special circumstances that may modify a general driving prohibition. Education and information programs are necessary for medical and regulatory authorities to develop a rational approach to driving and epilepsy worldwide.

PMID:
8026417
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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