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Autoimmunity. 1993;16(4):245-9.

Antibodies to phosphatidylethanolamine in antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus: their correlation with anticardiolipin antibodies and beta 2 glycoprotein-I plasma levels.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ioannina, Greece.

Abstract

The sera patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) were tested, by ELISA, for antibodies to phosphatidylethanolamine (aPE), as well as to cardiolipin (aCL) and compared to healthy blood donors (HBD). Both, SLE and APS patients presented a higher titre of IgM-aPE antibodies than normals, while the IgG and IgA aPE reactivity did not differ. APS patients were characterized by higher IgM-aPE antibody titres than SLE patients. In contrast, the predominant isotype of aCL antibodies in APS patients was IgG. The IgM aPE reactivity was correlated with IgM aCL reactivity, while no correlation was observed between the total IgM values and IgM-aPE binding units of sera tested. Since it was shown that beta 2-glycoprotein-I (beta 2-GPI) contributes to a complex antigen by binding to phospholipids and that this antigen is recognized by antiphospholipid antibodies from autoimmune patients, sera beta 2-GPI levels were measured and correlated to aCL and APE activity. Although APS patients had higher beta 2-GPI levels than SLE patients, no correlation was found between the beta 2-GPI levels and IgG/IgM aCL and IgM-aPE reactivities a finding suggesting that in addition to beta 2-GPI, other cofactors for aPE antibodies may exist. These findings indicate that aPE and aCL antibodies co-exist and that the IgM-isotype is predominant in APS. In addition, the IgA and IgG aPE antibodies appear to occur in low titres in these patients, as well as in normals and may exist as natural autoantibodies. We suggest that the high IgM-aPE antibodies may be viewed as a thymus independent process.

PMID:
8025204
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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