Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Jun;149(6):1400-6.

Indoor air pollution and asthma. Results from a panel study.

Author information

1
California Environmental Protection Agency, Berkeley 94704.

Abstract

Although there is abundant clinical evidence of asthmatic responses to indoor aeroallergens, the symptomatic impacts of other common indoor air pollutants from gas stoves, fireplaces, and environmental tobacco smoke have been less well characterized. These combustion sources produce a complex mixture of pollutants, many of which are respiratory irritants. We report here results of an analysis of associations between indoor pollution and several outcomes of respiratory morbidity in a population of adult asthmatics residing in the Denver, Colorado, metropolitan area. A panel of 164 asthmatics recorded in a daily diary the occurrence of several respiratory symptoms, nocturnal asthma, medication use, and restrictions in activity, as well as the use of gas stoves, wood stoves, or fireplaces, and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggests that the indoor sources of combustion have a statistically significant association with exacerbations of asthma. For example, after correcting for repeated measures and autocorrelation, the reported use of a gas stove was associated with moderate or worse shortness of breath (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.11-2.32), moderate or worse cough (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 0.97-3.01), nocturnal asthma (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.91-1.13), and restrictions in activity (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.0-2.16). Among this panel of relatively moderate to severe asthmatics, the respiratory irritants produced by several domestic combustion sources were associated with increased morbidity.

Comment in

PMID:
8004290
DOI:
10.1164/ajrccm.149.6.8004290
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center