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Crit Care Med. 1995 Jan;23(1):60-5.

Facilitation of internal jugular venous cannulation using an audio-guided Doppler ultrasound vascular access device: results from a prospective, dual-center, randomized, crossover clinical study.

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1
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore 21201-1595.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the utility of an audio-guided Doppler ultrasound device in improving success and decreasing complications in cannulation of the internal jugular vein in high-risk patients.

DESIGN:

Prospective, randomized, crossover clinical study.

SETTING:

Two major university medical centers in critical care environments.

PATIENTS:

Seventy-six consecutive, consenting adult patients with preexisting obesity or coagulopathy requiring central venous access.

INTERVENTIONS:

Subjects enrolled in the study were randomized to receive either the traditional "blind" (control) technique or the ultrasonic technique. A maximum of three cannulation attempts were allowed before crossover to three attempts with the alternative technique. All cannulations were attempted via the internal jugular vein through a high/central approach.

RESULTS:

Patient and operator characteristics were similar between groups. The initial use of an audio-guided ultrasound device was associated with increased success of cannulation (84.4% vs. 61.4%; p < .05) and decreased need to crossover to the alternative technique. Success on the first needle pass was more likely with the ultrasound technique (56.3% vs. 29.5%; p < .05). Significant complications were greater with the control technique (carotid artery puncture 16.3% vs. 2.0% [p < .02]; any significant complication 26.5% vs. 6.1% [p < .01]).

CONCLUSIONS:

The use of an audio-guided Doppler ultrasound vascular access device was associated with increased success of cannulation and a decreased frequency of significant complications in a population of high-risk patients with obesity or coagulopathy.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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