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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1994 Nov;171(5):1347-55.

Individualized smoking cessation counseling during prenatal and early postnatal care.

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1
Office of Health Promotion Research, University of Vermont, Burlington.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We examined the efficacy of individualized smoking cessation counseling added to obstetricians' and nurse-midwives' advice.

STUDY DESIGN:

In a mixed private and publicly supported prenatal clinic 600 pregnant women who smoked were randomly assigned to receive the usual advice from their obstetrician or nurse-midwife or the usual advice plus individualized smoking cessation counseling. Smoking status was measured by self-report and urinary cotinine/creatinine ratios at 36 weeks and by self-report during long-term postpartum follow-up.

RESULTS:

Quitting rates during pregnancy were not increased by adding individualized smoking cessation counseling to usual care. At the long-term follow-up, reported quitting rates were significantly greater among intervention group women cared for in the publicly supported clinic than among those receiving the usual care, 14.5% versus 2.5%, p < 0.01.

CONCLUSION:

Although adding individual smoking cessation counseling did not increase quitting rates during pregnancy, it should be considered for women in public maternity clinics because of its potential long-term effectiveness.

PMID:
7977545
DOI:
10.1016/0002-9378(94)90159-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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