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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1994 Oct;79(4):950-4.

Determinants of the rate of bone loss in normal postmenopausal women.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

Despite a large number of studies assessing relationships between putative risk factors and bone density, it is not known which factors influence the rate of axial bone loss in normal postmenopausal women. We have examined the relationships between the rate of bone loss (delta BMD) and variables related to calcium metabolism, lifestyle, diet (calcium, sodium, caffeine, and protein), body composition, muscle strength, sex hormones, and spinal osteophytosis in 122 normal postmenopausal women participating in a 2-yr prospective randomized placebo-controlled trial of calcium supplementation. Univariate correlation coefficients indicated that delta BMD at most sites was inversely related to baseline BMD and positively related to rate of change in body weight (0.10 < r < 0.36) and fat mass (0.11 < r < 0.42) during the study. Lean mass and its rate of change showed no consistent relationship to delta BMD. There was no correlation between delta BMD and any of the lifestyle, muscle strength, dietary, or hormonal indices or with the severity of spinal osteophytosis. Multiple regression analysis indicated that delta BMD in the total body was directly related to fat mass (P < 0.0001), the rate of change in fat mass (P < 0.0001), the renal tubular reabsorption of calcium (P < 0.01), and calcium treatment (P < 0.01) and inversely to the initial BMD (P < 0.0001; r2 = 0.42; P < 0.0001). Similar effects were seen throughout the skeleton, although the fraction of the variance accounted for was less in the subregions, consistent with the lower precision of measurement of regional bone density. It is concluded that baseline bone density, fat mass, and renal calcium handling are important factors influencing bone loss in normal postmenopausal women.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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