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Cytokine. 1994 Jul;6(4):414-24.

The human interferon alpha-receptor protein confers differential responses to human interferon-beta versus interferon-alpha subtypes in mouse and hamster cell transfectants.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Genetics and Virology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

Abstract

The human interferon alpha-receptor (IFNAR gene product or IFN alpha R protein) was expressed in hamster CHO cells and in mouse A9 cells. The response of the IFN alpha R cDNA transfectants to human IFNs was studied by measuring induction of (2'-5') A synthetase (2'-5' AS). In the murine cells, the IFN alpha R protein conferred response to the human IFN-alpha-8 (alpha-B) subtype, but not to huIFN-alpha-2 (alpha-A) or to huIFN-beta. In murine huIFN alpha R cDNA transfectants, containing a hygromycin B resistance gene placed under the control of the 2'-5' AS gene Interferon Response Sequence (IRS), survival and growth of the cells in the presence of hygromycin B was induced by huIFN-alpha-8 but not by huIFN-alpha-2, indicating that the effect of huIFN alpha R is transcriptional. In hamster CHO cells, the huIFN alpha R protein conferred a completely different pattern of response to human IFN subtypes. Thus, the CHO-IFN alpha R transfectants responded to huIFN-beta by 2'-5' AS induction as well as by activation of the ISGF3 and IRF-1 transcription factors. In contrast, the CHO-IFN alpha R cells showed no response to huIFN-alpha-8. The differential response conferred by the huIFN alpha R protein in the two types of rodent cells, indicates that IFN subtype recognition is influenced by another component contributed by the rodent host cell. The ability of human cells, and of human-mouse hybrid cells containing human chromosome 21, to respond to all IFN subtypes is likely to depend also on interactions of the IFN alpha R protein with additional receptor components.

PMID:
7948750
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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