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Ophthalmology. 1994 Oct;101(10):1651-6; discussion 1657.

Long-term functional outcome after early surgery compared with laser and medicine in open-angle glaucoma.

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1
Moorfields Eye Hospital, London.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This randomly allocated prospective clinical study was designed to assess the relative efficacy of laser trabeculoplasty, medical therapy, and trabeculectomy used as the primary treatment in open-angle glaucoma, with particular regard to the level of intraocular pressure control and the amount of visual field decay. No patient had received any antiglaucoma treatment before entry into the trial.

METHODS:

One hundred sixty-eight patients were entered into the trial and randomly allocated into one of the three treatment groups--laser, medicine, or surgery. Follow-up was for a minimum of 5 years. The patients were monitored in the standard way, including intraocular pressure estimations and visual field tests (initially using the Friedmann analyzer and later including Humphrey automated perimetry).

RESULTS:

Despite similar initial composition of the three treatment groups, primary surgery resulted in the lowest mean intraocular pressures. The perimeter Friedmann visual fields were shown to have deteriorated in patients in the medicine-treated group and to a lesser extent in patients in the laser-treated group, but not in patients in the surgery-treated group. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that the difference in field changes between laser and surgical treatments could be explained entirely by the difference between the intraocular pressure values at 6 months between the two groups. The same was not true for the medicine-treated group.

CONCLUSION:

Primary trabeculectomy appears to have the desired effect in preserving visual function in patients with high-tension glaucoma. This may be related to laser treatment might be expected to have the same effect.

PMID:
7936562
DOI:
10.1016/s0161-6420(94)31120-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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