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Nature. 1994 Oct 20;371(6499):702-4.

Beta-adrenergic activation and memory for emotional events.

Author information

1
Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, University of California, Irvine 92717-3800.

Abstract

Substantial evidence from animal studies suggests that enhanced memory associated with emotional arousal results from an activation of beta-adrenergic stress hormone systems during and after an emotional experience. To examine this implication in human subjects, we investigated the effect of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol hydrochloride on long-term memory for an emotionally arousing short story, or a closely matched but more emotionally neutral story. We report here that propranolol significantly impaired memory of the emotionally arousing story but did not affect memory of the emotionally neutral story. The impairing effect of propranolol on memory of the emotional story was not due either to reduced emotional responsiveness or to nonspecific sedative or attentional effects. The results support the hypothesis that enhanced memory associated with emotional experiences involves activation of the beta-adrenergic system.

PMID:
7935815
DOI:
10.1038/371702a0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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