Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Gastroenterology. 1994 Nov;107(5):1312-8.

A comparison of omeprazole and ranitidine in the prevention of recurrence of benign esophageal stricture. Restore Investigator Group.

Author information

1
Llandough Hospital, Penarth, South Glamorgan, Wales.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Dilatation combined with subsequent pharmacological control of gastroesophageal reflux represents a logical but poorly documented approach to the management of benign esophageal stricture. This large trial (366 patients) aimed to assess whether omeprazole as the most effective available medication for gastroesophageal reflux disease prevents recurrent stricture formation.

METHODS:

Patients (n = 366) were randomized in a double-blind study to undergo either omeprazole (20 mg once daily; 180 evaluable patients) or ranitidine therapy (150 mg twice daily; 185 evaluable patients) for 1 year after dilatation to 12-18-mm diameter (36-54F gauge). Subsequently, endoscopy and dilatation were performed when clinically indicated and endoscopy on completion. Symptoms were assessed at clinic visits every 3 months and using weekly diary cards.

RESULTS:

Fewer patients undergoing omeprazole therapy required redilatation compared with those on ranitidine (43 of 143 [30%] vs. 66 of 143 [46%] by 12 months; P < 0.01), and patients in the omeprazole group needed fewer redilatations during the year (0.48 vs. 1.08; P < 0.01). On completion, symptom relief favored omeprazole: 76% of patients in the omeprazole group were free of dysphagia (compared with 64% in the ranitidine group; P < 0.05); 83% were able to accept a normal diet (69%; P < 0.01); and 65% were completely asymptomatic (43%; P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Omeprazole, 20 mg once daily, was more effective than ranitidine, 150 mg twice daily, as prophylaxis against stricture recurrence and in providing symptom relief.

PMID:
7926495
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center