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BMJ. 1994 Aug 13;309(6952):436-40.

Reduction in blood pressure with a low sodium, high potassium, high magnesium salt in older subjects with mild to moderate hypertension.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical School, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effect of a reduced sodium and increased potassium and magnesium intake on blood pressure.

DESIGN:

Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.

SETTING:

General population of a suburb of Rotterdam.

SUBJECTS:

100 men and women between 55 and 75 years of age with untreated mild to moderate hypertension.

INTERVENTIONS:

During 24 weeks the intervention group received a mineral salt (sodium: potassium: magnesium 8:6:1) and foods prepared with the mineral salt. Controls received common salt and foods.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Change in blood pressure.

RESULTS:

Complete follow up was achieved for 97 of the 100 randomised subjects. Systolic blood pressure (mean of measurements at weeks 8, 16, and 24) fell by 7.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval 4.0 to 11.2) and diastolic blood pressure by 3.3 mm Hg (0.8 to 5.8) in the mineral salt group compared with the controls, with a 28% decrease in urinary sodium excretion and a 22% increase in urinary potassium excretion. Twenty five weeks after the study the difference in blood pressure between the groups was no longer detectable.

CONCLUSION:

Replacing common sodium salt by a low sodium, high potassium, high magnesium mineral salt could offer a valuable non-pharmacological approach to lowering blood pressure in older people with mild to moderate hypertension.

Comment in

  • ACP J Club. 1995 Jan-Feb;122(1):3.
PMID:
7920126
PMCID:
PMC2540967
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.309.6952.436
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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