Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Blood. 1994 Oct 1;84(7):2109-14.

Persistence of myeloid progenitor cells expressing BCR-ABL mRNA after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

Author information

1
Division of Hematologic Malignancies, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115.

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that tumor-specific bcr-abl mRNA can often be detected by polymerase chain reaction. (PCR) for months to years after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML). Nevertheless, the presence of bcr-abl mRNA by itself does not invariably predict for clinical relapse post-BMT. This has led to the hypothesis that bcr-abl mRNA might be expressed in cells that have lost either proliferative or myeloid differentiation potential. To directly characterize the cells detected by PCR in patients with CML after allogeneic BMT, we first identified five individuals in whom PCR-positive cells could be detected at multiple times post-BMT. Bone marrow samples from these individuals were cultured in vitro and single erythroid, granulocytic, and macrophage colonies, each containing 50 to 100 cells, were examined for the presence of bcr-abl mRNA by PCR. PCR-positive myeloid colonies could be detected in four of five individuals in marrow samples obtained 5 to 56 months post-BMT. Overall, 7 of 135 progenitor cell colonies (5.2%) were found to be PCR-positive. The expression of bcr-abl mRNA appeared to be equally distributed among committed erythroid, macrophage, and granulocyte progenitors. These patients have now been followed-up for an additional 20 to 33 months from the time of progenitor cell PCR analysis but only one of these individuals has been found to have cytogenetic evidence of recurrent Ph+ cells. These results show that long-term persistence of PCR-detectable bcr-abl mRNA after allogeneic BMT can be caused by the persistence of CML-derived clonogenic myeloid precursors that have survived the BMT preparative regimen. These cells continue to have both proliferative and myeloid differentiation capacity in vitro. Nevertheless, these PCR-positive cells do not appear to either expand or differentiate in vivo for prolonged periods, suggesting the presence of mechanisms for suppression of residual clonogenic leukemia cells in vivo.

PMID:
7919323
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center