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N Engl J Med. 1994 Oct 6;331(14):904-9.

A comparison of cabergoline and bromocriptine in the treatment of hyperprolactinemic amenorrhea. Cabergoline Comparative Study Group.

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1
Section of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cabergoline is a long-acting dopamine-agonist drug that suppresses prolactin secretion and restores gonadal function in women with hyperprolactinemic amenorrhea. We designed a study to compare its safety and efficacy with those of bromocriptine, which has been the standard therapy.

METHODS:

A total of 459 women with hyperprolactinemic amenorrhea were treated with either cabergoline (0.5 to 1.0 mg twice weekly) or bromocriptine (2.5 to 5.0 mg twice daily), administered in a double-blind fashion for 8 weeks and subsequently in an open fashion for 16 weeks, during which adjustments in the dose were made according to the response. Of the 459 women, 279 had microprolactinomas, 3 had macroprolactinomas, 1 had a craniopharyngioma, 167 had idiopathic hyperprolactinemia, and the remainder had an empty sella. Clinical and biochemical status was assessed at 2-week intervals for 8 weeks and monthly thereafter for a total of 6 months, with an additional assessment at 14 weeks.

RESULTS:

Stable normoprolactinemia was achieved in 186 of the 223 women treated with cabergoline (83 percent) and 138 of the 236 women treated with bromocriptine (59 percent, P < 0.001). Seventy-two percent of the women treated with cabergoline and 52 percent of those treated with bromocriptine had ovulatory cycles or became pregnant during treatment (P < 0.001). Amenorrhea persisted in 7 percent of the cabergoline-treated women and 16 percent of the bromocriptine-treated women. Adverse effects were recorded in 68 percent of the women taking cabergoline and 78 percent of those taking bromocriptine (P = 0.03); 3 percent discontinued taking cabergoline, and 12 percent stopped taking bromocriptine (P < 0.001) because of drug intolerance. Gastrointestinal symptoms were significantly less frequent, less severe, and shorter-lived in the women treated with cabergoline.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cabergoline is more effective and better tolerated than bromocriptine in women with hyperprolactinemic amenorrhea.

PMID:
7915824
DOI:
10.1056/NEJM199410063311403
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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