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Fertil Steril. 1995 Apr;63(4):729-33.

A comparative prospective study of conventional regimen with chronic low-dose administration of follicle-stimulating hormone for anovulation associated with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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  • 1Fertility Unit, Golda Meir Medical Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare efficiency of conventional and chronic low-dose regimens for treatment of anovulation associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

DESIGN:

Fifty participants divided into two equal groups. The first group was treated with urinary human FSH using a conventional stepwise protocol and the second group was treated with a regimen of chronic low-dose and small incremental rises with urinary human FSH or with recombinant human FSH for a maximum of three cycles.

SETTING:

Tertiary referral university hospital fertility unit.

PATIENTS:

Fifty infertile women with clomiphene citrate-resistant anovulation associated with PCOS.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Pattern of follicular development, amount of FSH required, serum E2 concentrations, cycle fecundity, cumulative conception, and live birth rates. Multiple pregnancy and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) rates.

RESULTS:

Compared with the conventional dose protocol, the chronic low-dose regimen yielded slightly improved pregnancy rates (40% versus 24%) while completely avoiding OHSS and multiple pregnancies, which were prevalent (11% and 33%, respectively) with conventional therapy. Monofollicular development was induced in 74% versus 27% of cycles, and the total number of follicles > 16 mm and E2 concentrations were half those observed on conventional therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

For women with PCOS, a chronic low-dose regimen of FSH eliminated complications of OHSS and multiple pregnancies while maintaining a satisfactory pregnancy rate. This modality, thus, has distinct advantages and could well replace conventional gonadotropin therapy for these patients.

PMID:
7890055
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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