Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Plant Mol Biol. 1994 Dec;26(5):1271-87.

Signal transduction in the sexual life of Chlamydomonas.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322.

Abstract

Several signal transduction pathways play important roles in the sexual life cycle of Chlamydomonas. Nitrogen deprivation, perhaps sensed as a drop in intracellular [NH4+], triggers a signal transduction pathway that results in altered gene expression and the induction of the gametogenic pathway. Blue light triggers a second signalling cascade which also culminates in gene induction and completion of gametogenesis. New screens have uncovered several mutants in these pathways, but so far we know little about the biochemical events that transduce the environmental signals of nitrogen deprivation and blue light into the changes in gene transcription that produce gametes. Cell-cell contact of mature, complementary gametes elicits a number of responses that prepare the cells for fusion. Contact is sensed by the agglutinin-mediated cross-linking of flagellar membrane proteins. An increase in [cAMP] couples protein cross-linking to the mating responses. In C. reinhardtii the cAMP signal appears to be generated by the sequential stimulation of as many as 3 distinct adenylyl cyclase activities. Although the molecular mechanisms of adenylyl cyclase activations are poorly understood, Ca2+ may play a role. Most of the mating responses appear to be triggered by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase, but here too, Ca2+ may play a role. Numerous mutants are facilitating studies of the signalling pathways that trigger the mating responses. Cell fusion triggers another series of events that culminate in the expression of zygote specific genes. The mature zygote is sensitive to a light signal which stimulates the expression of genes whose products are essential for germination. The signal transduction pathways that trigger zygospore formation and germination are ripe for investigation in this experimentally powerful system.

PMID:
7858190
DOI:
10.1007/bf00016474
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center