Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acta Neuropathol. 1994;88(5):426-32.

A comparison of perineurial and vascular basal laminal changes in diabetic neuropathy.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosciences, Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine, London, UK.

Abstract

Measurements were made of the thickness of the basal lamina of perineurial cells in the sural nerve in a series of patients with diabetic neuropathy and compared with a group of patients with type I hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) and with organ donor control cases. The thickness was significantly greater in the diabetic patients as compared both with the HMSN cases and the organ donor controls. This was most obvious for the intermediate layers of the perineurium. Perineurial basal laminal thickness was only slightly greater in the HMSN cases than in the organ donor controls and the difference was not statistically significant. The thickening of the perineurial cell basal laminae was compared with the thickening of the basal laminal zone around the endoneurial microvessels. No significant correlation was found either for the diabetic neuropathy or HMSN cases or for the organ donor controls. As had been observed previously, the basal laminal zone around the endoneurial capillaries was of increased thickness both in the diabetic neuropathy and the HMSN cases and, although it was greater for the diabetic neuropathy patients, the difference was not statistically significant. Taken together, these findings indicate that the thickening of the basal lamina of the perineurial cells is a more characteristic feature of diabetic neuropathy than is thickening of the basal laminal zone around the endoneurial capillaries. The results suggest that the causative mechanisms are likely to differ, a conclusion supported by the morphological appearances: the basal laminal thickening around the perineurial cells is uniform, whereas that around the capillaries consists of basal laminal reduplication.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
7847071
DOI:
10.1007/bf00389494
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center