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Fam Pract. 1994 Sep;11(3):292-5.

The effectiveness of waiting room notice-boards as a vehicle for health education.

Author information

1
Primary Medical Care Group, University of Southampton, Aldermoor Health Centre, UK.

Abstract

To determine whether patients read and remembered health promotion messages displayed in waiting rooms, 600 patients in a UK general practice were given a self-complete questionnaire. Two notice-boards carried between 1 to 4 topics over four study periods. Three-hundred and twenty-seven (55%) of subjects responded. Twenty-two per cent recalled at least one topic. Increasing the number of topics did not increase the overall impact of the notice-boards. The numbers of patients recalling a topic remained constant, but increasing the number of topics reduced the number remembering each individual topic. Patients aged over 60 years were less likely to recall topics, but waiting time, gender and health professional seen had no effect on results. Very few patients (< 10%) read or took health promotion leaflets. These results suggest that the role of waiting room notice-boards should be reassessed. More modern methods of communication such as electronic notice-boards or videos could be used. However, the waiting room might best function not as an area where a captive audience can be bombarded with health promotion messages, but rather as a place for relaxation before consulting a health professional, making patients more receptive to health advice in the consultation.

PMID:
7843520
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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