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J Am Coll Cardiol. 1995 Feb;25(2):387-94.

A prospective study of plasma fish oil levels and incidence of myocardial infarction in U.S. male physicians.

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1
Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston Massachusetts.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study evaluated whether increased intake of fish oils (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids) might reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.

BACKGROUND:

Observational and clinical studies have suggested that increased intake of fish oils, as reflected in plasma levels of fish oils, may reduce the risk of myocardial infarction.

METHODS:

A nested case-control study was conducted among the 14,916 participants in the Physicians' Health Study with a sample of plasma before randomization. Each participant with myocardial infarction occurring during the first 5 years of follow-up was matched by smoking status and age with a randomly chosen control participant who had not developed coronary heart disease.

RESULTS:

Mean levels of fish oils (with 95% confidence interval [CI] for paired differences and p values) in case and control participants, expressed as percent of total fatty acids, were, for eicosapentaenoic acid, 0.26 versus 0.25 (95% CI -0.03 to 0.05, p = 0.70) in cholesterol esters and 0.56 versus 0.54 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.09, p = 0.44) in phospholipids, and for docosahexaenoic acid, 0.23 versus 0.24 (95% CI -0.07 to 0.04, p = 0.64) in cholesterol esters and 2.22 versus 2.14 (95% CI -0.10 to 0.27, p = 0.36) in phospholipids. Results adjusted for major cardiovascular risk factors showed a very similar lack of association between fish oil levels and the incidence of myocardial infarction.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results indicate no beneficial effect of increased fish oil consumption on the incidence of a first myocardial infarction. However, the effect of very high levels of fish oils could not be evaluated.

PMID:
7829792
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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