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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1995 Jan;95(1 Pt 1):60-8.

Protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with asthma and control subjects.

Author information

1
Service des Maladies Respiratoires, CHU, Montpellier, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Secretory component (SC), Clara cell protein (CC10) and to some extent, IgM are proteins locally synthetized in airways. Albumin, alpha 2-macroglobulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin are mainly plasma proteins. In patients with asthma, blood proteins may occur in greater amounts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) than in control subjects because of plasma extravasation. These proteins were measured in BALF to define markers of local synthesis and plasma exudation.

METHODS:

Twenty-four patients with asthma (mean age, 40 +/- 3.1 years) and 24 control subjects (mean age, 29 +/- 11 years) were tested. Five aliquots of saline solution (50 ml) were instilled, and the recovered BALF was stored. Clara cell protein was measured by a sensitive immunoassay technique based on the agglutination of latex particles. SC, immunoglobulins, alpha 2-macroglobulin, alpha 1-antitrypsin, and albumin were measured by an immunoradiometric assay. Protein concentrations were normalized to albumin.

RESULTS:

In BALF from patients with asthma there was a significant increase in alpha 2-macroglobulin and IgM and a significant decrease of SC, alpha 1-antitrypsin, and Clara cell protein compared with control subjects. Also, the ratio to albumin was significantly increased for alpha 2-macroglobulin and IgM and decreased for SC. There was no correlation between the severity of asthma and the amount of proteins.

CONCLUSIONS:

BALF protein content is significantly different in patients with asthma and control subjects, for proteins produced locally and derived from plasma.

PMID:
7822665
DOI:
10.1016/s0091-6749(95)70153-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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