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JAMA. 1994 Sep 21;272(11):882-4.

Effects of music on cardiovascular reactivity among surgeons.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, State University of New York at Buffalo 14260.

Erratum in

  • JAMA 1994 Dec 14;272(22):1724.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effects of surgeon-selected and experimenter-selected music on performance and autonomic responses of surgeons during a standard laboratory psychological stressor.

DESIGN:

Within-subjects laboratory experiment.

SETTING:

Hospital psychophysiology laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 50 male surgeons aged 31 to 61 years, who reported that they typically listen to music during surgery, volunteered for the study.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:

Cardiac responses, hemodynamic measures, electrodermal autonomic responses, task speed, and accuracy.

RESULTS:

Autonomic reactivity for all physiological measures was significantly less in the surgeon-selected music condition than in the experimenter-selected music condition, which in turn was significantly less than in the no-music control condition. Likewise, speed and accuracy of task performance were significantly better in the surgeon-selected music condition than in the experimenter-selected music condition, which was also significantly better than the no-music control condition.

CONCLUSION:

Surgeon-selected music was associated with reduced autonomic reactivity and improved performance of a stressful nonsurgical laboratory task in study participants.

PMID:
7811324
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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