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Cancer. 1995 Jan 1;75(1):29-33.

Lung cancer in nonsmoking women. Histology and survival patterns.

Author information

1
Division of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Missouri Department of Health, Columbia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite the widespread view that important clinical and etiologic differences exist between histologic categories of lung cancer, few studies have examined the accuracy of hospital-reported pathologic diagnoses of lung cancer.

METHODS:

A review of pathologic material and an assessment of survival patterns were conducted in conjunction with a recently completed case-control study of lung cancer among nonsmoking women in Missouri. Using established protocols, tissue slides from tumors of 482 patients were reviewed by 3 pathologists.

RESULTS:

Adenocarcinoma was the most common histologic type among former smokers and lifetime nonsmokers. The overall agreement rate between the original and review diagnoses was 65.6%. The positive predictive value ranged from 0.33 for bronchioalveolar carcinomas to 0.84 for adenocarcinomas. Agreement rates for small, medium, and large hospitals were 63.1, 66.6, and 66.2%, respectively. Survival rates were highest for bronchioalveolar carcinoma and lowest for small cell carcinoma.

CONCLUSION:

Given the importance of lung cancer to public health and the need to examine risk by histologic type, these data indicate that pathologic review of registry-reported lung cancer cases may be an important component of large scale studies of etiology.

PMID:
7804973
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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