Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Exp Cell Res. 1995 Jun;218(2):499-507.

Characterization of human ovarian surface epithelial cells immortalized by human papilloma viral oncogenes (HPV-E6E7 ORFs).

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

Primary human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells were immortalized by a retroviral vector (LXSN-16E6E7) expressing HPV-E6E7 open reading frames (ORF). Immortalizations of primary ovarian epithelial cells were achieved in three of three attempts. Detailed analysis was carried out in one line, HOSE 6-3, selected on the basis of its epithelial morphology. The immortalized line (HOSE 6-3) was nontumorigenic in nude mice when examined at subculture number 20. Cytogenetic analysis confirmed its human origin and detailed karyotypic analysis revealed a mixed karyotype made up of about 60% of diploid and 40% of near-tetraploid cells. Clonal chromosomal aberration was observed in a subpopulation of cells involving a ring chromosome number 9. Immunofluorescence and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of vimentin and several species of cytokeratin (K7, K8, K18, K19). The profile of the cytoskeletal filaments of HOSE 6-3 cells is largely identical with that of normal ovarian epithelial cells before immortalization. The immortalized ovarian epithelial cells have a lower sensitivity to TGF-beta 1 inhibition compared to normal ovarian epithelial cells. The immortalized line, HOSE 6-3, has altered growth properties including a higher proliferation rate, plating efficiency, and saturation density. The establishment of a continuous line of human ovarian epithelial cells may provide an in vitro model for study of carcinogenesis in human ovarian cancers.

PMID:
7796885
DOI:
10.1006/excr.1995.1184
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center