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Chest. 1994 Aug;106(2):540-4.

Comparison of pressure and flow triggering systems during continuous positive airway pressure.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, USA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

Compare the inspiratory work of breathing (WOBI) during pressure triggering (PT), and flow triggering (FT) using two microprocessor ventilators.

DESIGN:

A randomized, crossover comparison of triggering strategies and ventilators used.

SETTING:

Surgical intensive care unit.

PATIENTS:

Ten patients recovering from acute respiratory failure (eight men, two women; mean age, 48 +/- 12 years) breathing on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) of 5 cm H2O were studied.

INTERVENTIONS:

Patients were randomly assigned to either receive 5 cm H2O CPAP via one of two units (Hamilton Veolar or Puritan Bennett 7200ae) using either PT or FT. Each patient had 30-min trials using the following: (1) Veolar FT; (2) Veolar PT; (3) 7200ae FT; and (4) 7200ae FT.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

During each trial period, work of breathing (WOB) and pressure time product (PTP) were measured using a respiratory monitor (Bi-core CP-100). All patients were placed in semi-Fowler position and esophageal balloons were inserted and their position confirmed using the occlusion technique. Continuous measurements of peak negative pressure during inspiration, tidal volume (VT), minute ventilation (VE), respiratory frequency (f) were accomplished with a flow transducer at the proximal airway. FT with the 7200ae was superior to PT as measured by both the WOB (0.58 +/- 0.3 vs 0.84 +/- 0.2 J/L, p < 0.01) and PTP (148 +/- 50 vs 206 +/- 41 cm H2O/s/min, p, 0.05). FT with the Veolar was also superior to PT with respect to the WOB (0.53 +/- 0.2 vs 0.93 +/- 0.2 J/L, p < 0.01) and PTP (140 +/- 39 vs 229 +/- 46 cm H2O/s/min, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

FT reduces the WOB compared with PT, regardless of the ventilator used. The reduction in WOB during FT is related to improved responsiveness and changes in the posttrigger phase.

PMID:
7774334
DOI:
10.1378/chest.106.2.540
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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