Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Dev Neurosci. 1994;16(5-6):291-300.

Energy metabolism in cortical synaptic terminals from weanling and mature rat brain: evidence for multiple compartments of tricarboxylic acid cycle activity.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore 21201, USA.

Abstract

It is well documented that the brain preferentially utilizes alternative substrates for energy during brain development; however, less is known about the use of these substrates by synaptic terminals. The present study compared the rates of 14CO2 production from 1 mM D-[6-14C]glucose, L-[U-14C]glutamine, D-3-hydroxy[3-14C]butyrate, L-[U-14C]lactate and L-[U-14C]malate by synaptic terminals isolated from 17- to 18-day-old and 7- to 8-week-old rat brain. The rates of 14CO2 production from glucose, glutamine, 3-hydroxybutyrate, lactate and malate were 8.55 +/- 0.78, 25.90 +/- 4.58, 42.28 +/- 3.54, 48.42 +/- 2.09, and 9.31 +/- 1.61 nmol/h/mg protein (mean +/- SEM), respectively, in synaptic terminals isolated from 17- to 18-day-old rat brain and 12.95 +/- 1.64, 30.62 +/- 4.19, 16.09 +/- 2.62, 40.33 +/- 6.77, and 8.25 +/- 1.69 nmol/h/mg protein (mean +/- SEM), respectively, in synaptic terminals isolated from 7- to 8-week-old rat brain. In competition studies using unlabelled added substrates, the addition of 3-hydroxybutyrate, lactate or glutamine greatly decreased the rate of 14CO2 production from labelled glucose. Added unlabelled glucose increased the rate of 14CO2 production from 3-hydroxybutyrate in synaptic terminals from 7- to 8-week-old rat brain, but had no effect on 14CO2 production from any other substrates. Lactate also increased 14CO2 production from 3-hydroxybutyrate at 7-8 weeks, whereas the addition of 3-hydroxybutyrate decreased 14CO2 production from lactate only in synaptic terminals from 17- to 18-day-old rat brain. None of the added substrates altered the rate of 14CO2 production from labelled glutamine or malate suggesting that these substrates are metabolized in relatively distinct compartments within synaptic terminals. Overall the data demonstrate that synaptic terminals from both weanling and adult rat brain can utilize a variety of substrates for energy. In addition, the competition studies demonstrate that the interactions of substrates change with age and suggest that there are multiple compartments of energy metabolism (or tricarboxylic acid cycle activity) in isolated synaptic terminals.

PMID:
7768208
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center