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Sci Total Environ. 1995 Apr 21;166:149-55.

Lead and cadmium levels in human milk and blood.

Author information

1
Toxicology Division Swedish National Food Administration, Uppsala.

Abstract

Lead and cadmium levels were determined (with AAS) in blood and milk obtained at 6 weeks after delivery from women living in the vicinity of a copper and lead metal smelter and in a control area. Analysis of lead and cadmium were also performed in blood samples obtained at delivery. Accuracy of the analysis was confirmed by the analysis of quality control samples. In general, blood and milk levels of lead and cadmium were low in both areas. At 6 weeks after delivery the lead levels in blood and milk were 32 +/- 8 and 0.7 +/- 0.4 micrograms Pb/l, respectively (total mean +/- S.D., n = 75). Cadmium levels in blood and milk were 0.9 +/- 0.3 and 0.06 +/- 0.04 microgram Cd/l, respectively (n = 75). At delivery the lead levels in blood of women in the smelter area were higher, 38.7 micrograms Pb/l, than the blood lead levels in women from the control area, 32.3 micrograms Pb/l, (P < 0.001). At 6 weeks after delivery there was no difference in blood lead levels between the two groups. In contrast, the lead levels in milk were higher in women from the smelter area, 0.9 microgram Pb/l, than in women from the control area, 0.5 microgram Pb/l, (P < 0.001). No differences in blood cadmium levels were found between the two groups. Milk cadmium levels in women from the control area, 0.07 microgram Cd/l, were somewhat higher (P < 0.01) than in women from the smelter area, 0.05 microgram Cd/l.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
7754354
DOI:
10.1016/0048-9697(95)04523-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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