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Biochem Pharmacol. 1995 Apr 18;49(8):1165-70.

Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 integrase by curcumin.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-4255, USA.

Abstract

Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the yellow pigment in turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) that is widely used as a spice, food coloring (curry) and preservative. Curcumin exhibits a variety of pharmacological effects including antitumor, anti-inflammatory, and anti-infectious activities and is currently in clinical trials for AIDS patients. The effects of curcumin have been determined on purified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase. Curcumin has an inhibitory concentration50 (IC50) for strand transfer of 40 microM. Inhibition of an integrase deletion mutant containing only amino acids 50-212 suggests that curcumin interacts with the integrase catalytic core. Two structural analogs, methyl cinnamate and chlorogenic acid, were inactive. Energy minimization studies suggest that the anti-integrase activity of curcumin could be due to an intramolecular stacking of two phenyl rings that brings the hydroxyl groups into close proximity. The present data suggest that HIV-1 integrase inhibition may contribute to the antiviral activity of curcumin. These observations suggest new strategies for antiviral drug development that could be based upon curcumin as a lead compound for the development of inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

PMID:
7748198
DOI:
10.1016/0006-2952(95)98514-a
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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