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Am J Cardiol. 1995 May 15;75(15):987-92.

Comparison of in-hospital outcome in men versus women treated by either thrombolytic therapy or primary coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction.

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1
Cardiovascular Institute, El Camino Hospital, Mountain View, California 94040, USA.

Abstract

At 12 centers, 395 patients, including 288 men (73%) and 107 women (27%) with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), were prospectively randomized to treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) or primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Compared with men, women were older (65.7 vs 57.7 years, p < 0.0001), more often had diabetes mellitus (19% vs 10%, p = 0.03), systemic hypertension (54% vs 39%, p = 0.005), prior congestive heart failure (5% vs 0%, p = 0.002), and presented later after symptom onset (229 vs 174 minutes, p = 0.0004). The in-hospital mortality in women was 3.3-fold higher than men (9.3% vs 2.8%, p = 0.005). After adjustment for comorbid baseline characteristics, however, only advanced age independently correlated with mortality. Among t-PA-treated patients, mortality was significantly higher in women than in men (14.0% vs 3.5%, p = 0.006). Intracranial hemorrhage after t-PA was also more common in women than in men (5.3% vs 0.7%, p = 0.037). In contrast, women and men had similar in-hospital mortality after primary PTCA (4.0% vs 2.1%, respectively, p = 0.46). No intracranial bleeding occurred in PTCA-treated patients. A univariate trend was present for reduced in-hospital mortality in women treated with PTCA rather than t-PA (4.0% vs 14.0%, p = 0.07). By multiple logistic regression analysis of 15 clinical variables, treatment with PTCA rather than t-PA, as well as younger age, were independently predictive of in-hospital survival in women.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
7747700
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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