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Med J Aust. 1995 May 1;162(9):475-8.

The impact of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on aboriginal mortality in Western Australia, 1989-1991.

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1
State Health Purchasing Authority, Health Department of Western Australia, Perth.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare the estimated death rates associated with alcohol and tobacco use for Australian Aboriginals in Western Australia with those for non-Aboriginals.

METHOD:

Deaths attributable to tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption were estimated for 1989-1991 with the aetiological fractions method, using data from the Health Department of Western Australia's mortality database.

RESULTS:

Tobacco smoking was responsible for 15.4% of all deaths and 13.9% of Aboriginal deaths, and alcohol consumption for 5% and 9.2%, respectively. The age-standardised death rates per 100,000 person-years for tobacco and alcohol were: Aboriginal males, 271 and 152; other males, 113 and 29; Aboriginal females, 118 and 56; and other females, 32 and 15. Of those who died as a result of tobacco use, 49% of Aboriginal males and 48% of Aboriginal females died before 55 years of age, compared with 11% and 10%, respectively, in non-Aboriginal males. For alcohol-related deaths, 62% of Aboriginal males and 70% of Aboriginal females died before 55 years of age, compared with 35% and 23%, respectively, in non-Aboriginals.

CONCLUSION:

During 1989-1991 tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption were responsible for much higher death rates among Aboriginals than among non-Aboriginals in Western Australia.

PMID:
7746204
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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