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Health Psychol. 1995 Jan;14(1):13-21.

A preliminary evaluation of the cognitive and motor effects of pediatric HIV infection in Zairian children.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Spring Arbor College, Michigan 49283, USA.

Abstract

Fourteen asymptomatic HIV-infected Zairian children under 2 years of age displayed social and motor developmental deficits on the Denver Developmental Screening Test when compared with 20 HIV-negative cohorts born to HIV-infected mothers and 16 control children. In a second study, 11 infected children over 2 years of age had sequential motor and visual-spatial memory deficits on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children and motor development deficits on the Early Childhood Screening Profiles. HIV infection affects central nervous system structures mediating motor and spatial memory development, even in seemingly asymptomatic children. Furthermore, maternal HIV infection compromises the labor-intensive provision of care in the African milieu and undermines global cognitive development in even uninfected children.

PIP:

Language and motor skill deficits have been noted for HIV-infected children when tested with Stanford-Binet. With the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities, quantitative, verbal, and memory ability deficits have also been documented with infected children and are particularly significant for those children with accompanying neurological impairment from the virus. Deficits of visual-spatial integrative ability and memory have also been identified with the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. This paper reports results from a direct comparison of differences in cognitive and motor skills development between HIV-1-seropositive and HIV-1-seronegative children born to infected African mothers. Both subgroups were subsequently compared to a third group of HIV-negative children born to noninfected mothers in order to better assess some of the second-order effects of the epidemic upon the development of children who are not themselves infected, but who bear the consequences of the disease in the form of illness of the primary caregiver, and the hardship which that imposes upon the entire family. Such factors are most likely especially severe for nonaffluent families in developing countries. 14 asymptomatic HIV-infected Zairian children under 2 years old displayed social and motor developmental deficits on the Denver Developmental Screening Test when compared with 20 HIV-negative cohorts born to HIV-infected mothers and 16 control children. In the second study, 11 infected children over 2 years old had sequential motor and visual-spatial memory deficits on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children and motor development deficits on the Early Childhood Screening Profiles. The authors conclude that HIV infection affects central nervous system structures mediating motor and spatial memory development, even in seemingly asymptomatic children. Moreover, maternal HIV infection compromises the labor-intensive provision of care in the African milieu and undermines global cognitive development in even uninfected children.

PMID:
7737068
DOI:
10.1037//0278-6133.14.1.13
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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