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Am J Cardiol. 1995 May 1;75(14):886-9.

Predictors of groin complications after balloon and new-device coronary intervention.

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1
Andreas Gruentzig Cardiovascular Center, Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA.

Abstract

We reviewed the clinical course of 5,042 patients who underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) using balloons or new devices: (stent, laser, directional and rotational atherectomy). A vascular complication was defined as the formation of a groin hematoma, bleeding, pseudoaneurysm, fistula, or the need for surgical repair. Vascular complications occurred in 309 (6.1%) patients, and 117 (2.3%) required vascular repair; among these patients, surgery was performed for correction of an an arteriovenous fistula in 12%, repair of pseudoaneurysm in 72%, repair for expanding hematoma and femoral artery lacerations in 10%, and retroperitoneal bleeding in 6%. The correlates of vascular complications were older age (66.8 vs 62.1 years; p < 0.0001), female gender (43% vs 26%; p < 0.0001), increased weight (82.1 +/- 16.46 vs 78.0 +/- 16.6 kg; p < 0.001), higher systolic blood pressure (140 +/- 25 vs 134 +/- 20 mm Hg; p < 0.001), increased heparin dose during the procedure (14,352 +/- 3,879 vs 13,599 +/- 3,508 IU; p = 0.001), administration of heparin after the procedure (232 vs 2,985 patients; p < 0.0001) and intracoronary stenting (14.9% vs 3.5%; p < 0.0001). Fifteen patients of 214 (7.0%) who underwent stent implantation had surgical repair. Vascular complications were not related to the size of the arterial sheath (8.11 +/- 0.8 vs 8.8 +/- 0.7Fr; p = 0.11) and the use of devices other than stents (laser, atherectomy) did not increase the rate of vascular complications.

PMID:
7732995
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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