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J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1995 Mar;77(2):296-8.

Rotator-cuff changes in asymptomatic adults. The effect of age, hand dominance and gender.

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1
Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202, USA.

Abstract

We studied the integrity of the rotator cuff in both dominant and non-dominant shoulders of 90 asymptomatic adults between the ages of 30 and 99 years using ultrasound. The criteria for diagnosis had been validated on unembalmed cadaver specimens. We found no statistically significant difference in the incidence of impingement findings between dominant and non-dominant arms or between genders. The prevalence of partial- or full-thickness tears increased markedly after 50 years of age: these were present in over 50% of dominant shoulders in the seventh decade and in 80% of subjects over 80 years of age. Our results indicate that rotator-cuff lesions are a natural correlate of ageing, and are often present with no clinical symptoms. Treatment should be based on clinical findings and not on the results of imaging.

PMID:
7706351
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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