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J Gen Intern Med. 1995 Jan;10(1):25-32.

Sleep problems and their correlates in a working population.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco 94120, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To measure the prevalence of sleep problems in a working population and examine their association with health problems, health-related quality-of-life measures, work-related problems, and medical expenditures. Also, to explore the usefulness of a sleep-problems screen for mental health conditions and underlying sleep disorders.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey administered via voice mail and telephone interview.

SETTING:

A San Francisco Bay Area telecommunications firm.

PARTICIPANTS:

Volunteer sample of 588 employees who worked for a minimum of six months at the company and were enrolled in its fee-for-service health plan.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Thirty percent of respondents reported currently experiencing sleep problems and were found to have worse functioning and well-being (general health, cognitive functioning, energy), more work-related problems (decreased job performance and lower satisfaction, increased absenteeism), and a greater likelihood of comorbid physical and mental health conditions than were the respondents who did not have sleep problems. They also demonstrated a trend toward higher medical expenditures.

CONCLUSIONS:

Self-perceived sleep problems were common among the respondents and were associated with poorer health and health-related quality of life. A single question about sleep problems may serve as an effective screen for identifying primary care patients with mental health problems, as well as underlying sleep disorders.

PMID:
7699483
DOI:
10.1007/bf02599573
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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