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Mol Microbiol. 1993 Jul;9(1):1-7.

The role of mRNA degradation in the regulated expression of bacterial photosynthesis genes.

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1
Zentrum für Molekulare Biologie Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

Regulation of gene expression in bacteria, as in eukaryotic cells, is often achieved by variation of mRNA levels. Since the steady state levels of mRNA depend on both the rate of synthesis and the rate of decay, both mechanisms are important for gene regulation. After considerable effort undertaken over many years to understand the regulation of transcription, mRNA degradation has recently gained increasing attention as an important step in the regulation of some bacterial genes, and many investigations have addressed the mechanisms involved in mRNA decay. The puf mRNA of Rhodobacter capsulatus encoding pigment binding proteins has become a model system to study decay of a polycistronic mRNA and the role of mRNA degradation in gene expression. Individual segments of the polycistronic puf mRNA display extremely different half-lives. These differences in stability of mRNA segments are involved in the differential expression of puf encoded genes and consequently contribute to the stoichiometry of light-harvesting I and reaction centre complexes that results in optimal growth. In addition, control of mRNA stability is involved in the oxygen-dependent regulation of photosynthesis genes. High oxygen tension results in decreased stability of the reaction-centre specific puf mRNA segment, most likely by affecting the rate of endonucleolytic cleavage within the reaction centre coding region. The results obtained from studying puf mRNA degradation in R. capsulatus and Escherichia coli suggest that a specific distribution of decay promoting and decay impeding mRNA elements along the polycistronic mRNA is responsible for the different half-lives of individual puf segments.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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