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Eur J Immunol. 1993 Mar;23(3):600-7.

Human immunodeficiency virus gp120 and derived peptides activate protein tyrosine kinase p56lck in human CD4 T lymphocytes.

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1
INSERM U132, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris, France.

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus binds to CD4 T lymphocytes by interaction between its envelope glycoprotein gp120 and the CD4 molecule. The latter is non-covalently associated with a src-related tyrosine kinase, p56lck. CD4 cross-linking increases the activity of p56lck, leading to phosphorylation of several cellular substrates. We report here that gp160/120 increases both the autophosphorylation of p56lck and its enzymatic activity (reflected by phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate) in normal T cells and the HUT78 CD4+ T cell line. This effect was detectable 5 min after activation and persisted for 40 min in normal T cells. It did not require gp120 cross-linking and was associated with phosphorylation of tyrosine residue on several proteins, as shown by phosphotyrosine Western blot analysis. The pattern of proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in response to gp120 activation was distinct from that induced by anti-CD4 antibodies. p56lck activation required its association with CD4, since p56lck activity was not modified in HUT78 T cell lines expressing a truncated or mutated form of CD4 unable to associate with p56lck. Peptides mimicking residues 418 to 434 and 449 to 464 of HIV-1 Bru gp120, regions known to participate in gp120 binding to CD4, also increased p56lck activity and triggered phosphorylation of similar substrates. Taken together, these results show that gp160/120 and derived peptides can transiently increase p56lck activity without the need for CD4 cross-linking. This activation led to a specific pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation on cellular proteins that may be of significance in the biological effects of the gp120/CD4 interaction, e.g. syncytium formation and inhibition of T cell activation.

PMID:
7680610
DOI:
10.1002/eji.1830230303
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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