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J Clin Invest. 1993 Jan;91(1):362-7.

Bone marrow-derived osteoclast-like cells from a patient with craniometaphyseal dysplasia lack expression of osteoclast-reactive vacuolar proton pump.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Osaka University School of Medicine, Japan.

Abstract

Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare craniotubular bone dysplasia transmitted in autosomal dominant or recessive form. This disease is characterized by cranial bone hyperostosis and deformity of the metaphyses of the long bones. Using osteoclast-like cells formed from patient bone marrow cells, we investigated the pathophysiology of CMD in a 3-yr-old patient. Untreated bone marrow cells from the patient differentiated into osteoclast-like cells in vitro. These cells were shown to have vitronectin beta-receptors using a specific monoclonal antibody, i.e., 23C6 (CD51), which reacts with osteoclasts in human bone biopsy samples. However, the number of these osteoclast-like cells formed from the patient's bone marrow was only 40% of the normal controls. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D3, bovine 1-34 parathyroid hormone, recombinant human interleukin-1 beta, recombinant human interleukin-6, or recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor significantly increased, while salmon calcitonin significantly inhibited, the number of osteoclast-like cells. However, these cells could not resorb sperm whale dentin slices and lacked the osteoclast-reactive vacuolar proton pump as evidenced by a monoclonal antibody (E11). Western blot analysis using a monoclonal antibody to pp60c-src (327) revealed that protooncogene c-src expression by the platelets of the CMD patient was comparable to the normal control. These data suggest that: (a) the hyperostosis and the metaphyseal long bone deformity in the present CMD patient might be explained by osteoclast dysfunction due to impaired expression of the osteoclast-reactive vacuolar proton pump; and (b) a protooncogene c-src was not associated with the pathogenesis of the present CMD patient.

PMID:
7678608
PMCID:
PMC330035
DOI:
10.1172/JCI116194
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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