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Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1995 Jun 1;20(11):1265-70.

Low back pain in schoolchildren. A study of familial and psychological factors.

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1
Service de Rheumatologie, Médecine Physique et Rééducation, Höpital Cantanol, Fribourg, Switzerland.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

The results of a survey organized in the school system of the Swiss canton of Fribourg. An original questionnaire was developed for this study are reported.

OBJECTIVES:

The goal of this study was to evaluate the possible role of familial or psychological factors in schoolchildren reporting nonspecific low back pain.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

Previous surveys have shown a high prevalence of nonspecific low back. pain among schoolchildren, particularly teen-agers. The reported familial incidence raises, among others, the question of a possible role of psychological or behavioral factors.

METHODS:

This survey was performed with a validated 43-item self-administered questionnaire eliciting information about back pain history, family characteristics, children's activities, and psychological parameters. All schoolchildren (n = 615), ages 12-17 years, in two secondary schools (Fribourg, Switzerland) were surveyed. The response rate was 98%.

RESULTS:

Reported lifetime prevalence of back pain was 74%. Lumbar pain was the most frequent localization of pain (69% of back pain). The measured psychological factors were significantly associated with reported nonspecific low back pain and its consequences as well as with sibling history of low back pain.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study suggests that psychological factors play a role in children's reporting of nonspecific low back pain.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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