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BMJ. 1995 Aug 19;311(7003):495-7.

Raising the dead: war, reparation, and the politics of memory.

Author information

1
Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture, London.

Abstract

All societies attach a different range of meanings to war than to natural disasters, and questions of societal recognition, reparation, and justice are generally central. Most modern conflict has been grounded in the use of terror to control and silence whole populations. Those abusing power typically refuse to acknowledge their dead victims, as if they had never existed and were mere wraiths in the memories of those left behind. This denial, and the impunity of those who maintain it, must be challenged if survivors are to make sense of their losses and the social fabric is to mend. For the names and fate of the dead to be properly lodged in the public record of their times also illuminates the costs that may flow from the philosophies and practices of the Western led world order, ones which health workers should be in a position to influence.

PMID:
7647648
PMCID:
PMC2550549
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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