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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1995 Aug;110(2):405-15.

What factors affect ventricular performance after a Fontan-type operation?

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1
National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

Postoperative conditions after a Fontan-type operation, particularly as they affect results in the early term, are thought to depend on factors such as the state of pulmonary circulation and ventricular function. In this study, we attempted to determine the factors that influence ventricular characteristics in the middle term after Fontan-type procedures. Catheterization was performed at a mean of 15 months after operation in 57 patients with univentricular atrioventricular connection who underwent the operation between 1.0 and 22.6 years of age. End-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, and end-diastolic pressure of the systemic ventricle were analyzed together with an estimation of the systemic flow index. These parameters were influenced significantly by the presence of atrioventricular valve insufficiency. The morphologically left ventricle showed a better ejection fraction than did the morphologically right ventricle, whereas the systemic flow index was greater in patients undergoing total cavopulmonary connection than in those receiving an atriopulmonary connection. Young age was significantly associated with a better postoperative contractility, whereas the potential for impaired ventricular compliance was suggested in several patients undergoing operation after 4 years of age. On the basis of our results, we conclude that total cavopulmonary connection performed at a young age should be the surgical procedure of choice and that atrioventricular insufficiency must be treated properly at, and even after, the initial definitive repair.

PMID:
7637359
DOI:
10.1016/S0022-5223(95)70237-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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