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J Med Microbiol. 1995 Aug;43(2):92-8.

Bacteroides infections in children.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA.

Abstract

From 1974 to 1990, 336 Bacteroides isolates were obtained from 312 specimens from 274 patients. They comprised 180 (54%) B. fragilis isolates, 55 (16%) B. theta-iotaomicron, 36 (11%) B. vulgatus, 34 (10%) B. distasonis, 21 (6%) B. ovatus and 10 (3%) B. uniformis. Infections in 253 (92%) patients were polymicrobial, but in 21 (8%) children, a Bacteroides sp. was isolated in pure culture. Most Bacteroides isolates were from peritoneal fluid (114), abscesses (110), wound infections (20), blood cultures (10) and from patients with pneumonia (14) or chronic otitis media (8). Predisposing conditions were present in 145 (53%) children; these were previous surgery (46), trauma (28), malignancy (21), prematurity (19), immunodeficiency (18), steroid therapy (12) foreign body (10), diabetes (9) and sickle cell disease (7). The micro-organisms isolated most commonly mixed with Bacteroides spp. were anaerobic cocci (221), Escherichia coli (122), Fusobacterium spp. (38) and Clostridium spp. (30). All patients received antimicrobial therapy in conjunction with surgical drainage or correction of pathology in 197 (72%) cases. All but 12 (5%) patients recovered. These data illustrate the importance of Bacteroides spp. in infections in children.

PMID:
7629859
DOI:
10.1099/00222615-43-2-92
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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