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Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1995 Apr;19(4):270-4.

Lipoprotein lipase gene polymorphisms: associations with hypertriglyceridemia and body mass index in obese people.

Author information

1
INSERM U286, Faculté Xavier Bichat, Paris, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare body mass index (BMI), lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein concentrations according to the Hind III and Pvu II restriction polymorphisms of the LPL gene in obese subjects.

DESIGN:

Cross sectional study of anthropometric and lipid variables in relation to genetic factors.

SETTING:

Nutrition Outpatient Clinic of Bichat Hospital in Paris, France.

SUBJECTS:

236 unrelated patients (162 women and 74 men) were selected on the basis of 120% of ideal body weight.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Anthropometry (body mass index, waist to hip ratio), blood lipids and lipoproteins, determination of LPL Hind III and Pvu II genotypes.

RESULTS:

Digestion with Hind III generated two alleles, H1 (absence of cutting site) and H2 (presence of cutting site), with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.70 respectively. Digestion with Pvu II generated two alleles P1 and P2 with frequencies of 0.49 and 0.51 respectively. The Hind III polymorphism was significantly associated with body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.05). The H2H2 genotype was associated with hypertriglyceridemia: 68% of the hypertriglyceridemic subjects have the H2H2 genotype vs 43% of the normotriglyceridemic group (P < 0.05). Plasma triglyceride levels varied significantly among the Hind III genotypes, H2H2 genotype having the highest total and VLDL-triglyceride levels; the Hind III polymorphism also showed a significant association with HDL2-cholesterol. These associations were only seen in women and were not explained by the variations in BMI and age. No significant associations were found between lipid traits and Pvu II genotype.

CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that genetic variation in the LPL gene in obese subjects is associated with hypertriglyceridemia and possibly with a predisposition to obesity.

PMID:
7627251
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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